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TextBroker Review: Is It a Viable Option for Buying Content for Your Website?

Text Broker Review

Truth #1: Many of the popular bloggers you follow outsource their content creation. 

Truth #2: Buying content for your website is risky and most writers aren't very good. 

I like to consider myself the last of a dying breed of bloggers who do write a majority of their own content. 

I enjoy it. 

That being said, I have outsourced a number of articles using TextBroker.com and my results have been hit and miss. 

I'll explain how I've used TextBroker, the quality of their work and whether or not it actually recommend it (spoiler, I don't recommend it for most websites, more on why shortly). 

By first, let me explain what TextBroker is.

What Is TextBroker

TextBroker is a service that connects writers with people looking for content. 

In addition to blog posts, you can also purchase another of other writing services.

  • General template (I honestly have no idea what the heck this is)
  • Basic short blog post
  • Blog (This is for longer posts but it isn't explained well in the description)
  • Blog ideation
  • Order guidelines (Again, I don't understand what this really means)
  • Press release
  • Product description
  • Social media Facebook 
  • Social media Twitter
  • Website content (I don't know how this differs from the blog post options). 

So, right out of the gate, TextBroker starts off the buyer experience on a strange foot with confusing task options. 

TextBroker Review

A minor issue that I'm willing to overlook as long as the articles I purchase are high quality (again, more on that shortly). 

Whichever option you choose, TextBroker provides buyers with a number of additional options and order customizations. 

Here is what the order page looks like when I have ordered blog posts in the past..

TextBroker Order

You can choose:

  • Project category
  • Writer quality level (1-5)
  • Word count
  • Processing time
  • Keywords to target

There is a template order briefing that you can customize to your liking (I have always simplified it). 

Pricing for orders varies based on the word count and writer quality level.

TextBroker Writer Quality

TextBroker quality

Quality levels 2-3 are essentially a joke (there is no level 1).

I wouldn't use these levels even if I was trying to load a spam site with filler content. 

It is clear these levels are written by people who don't speak english as their first language. 

The only reason I even bothered ordering content from this quality level was for the purpose of this review. I could tell by the quality of the level 4 and level 5 work I had ordered that anything below that was likely going to be really, really bad. 

"Quality levels 2-3 are essentially a joke...I wouldn't use these levels even if I was trying to load a spam site with filler content."

Level 4 is acceptable if your ok with doing a lot of editing (I plan on doing a lot more editing than most people do anyway, more on that next). 

Level 5 is close to good. The writing I've had has still come off as a bit awkward and the author's knowledge of the topic of the posts has always come off as lacking. 

The price difference between level 4 and level 5 is steep. 

At the time of this writing, a 800-1000 word blog post at level 4 costs $26.75.

The same blog post at level 5 costs around $79.55 (3x the price of a level 4).

In fairness to TextBroker, there are many different writers and some will inevitably be better than others. If you use the service a lot, you will notice the better writers and can start sending them work directly instead of making it available to everyone. 

How I've Used TextBroker

Based on my experiences, I cannot trust TextBroker enough to recommend it highly to my followers BUT I do use it occassionally in certain circumstances. 

I will use TextBroker to create a "starting point" for an article that is on a dry topic that I know will rank highly in search engines. 

Of the content I get, I revise/rewrite at least 30% to 40% of it. 

I would NEVER recommend using TextBroker content without revising the hell out of it first. 

Since I use Thrive Themes, I need to format the content I'm given anyway (authors don't add images for me). So, while I'm formatting, I also edit and revise. I do my best to add my voice into the dry content written by authors who don't know me or my audience. 

"I would NEVER recommend using TextBroker content without revising the hell out of it first."

Here is an overview of the process I have used:

1. Do quality keyword research.

I use a combination of KW Finder and Ahrefs for keyword research.  

2. Find article topics that could rank for these keywords.

I'll brainstorm article ideas that will rank for the keywords that I see are being searched AND can realistically be ranked highly for.  

3. If the content is dry and I don't have a great deal of time, I will outsource it.

‚ÄčIf it is something I am passionate about, I will write it myself. 

4. Revise and reformat the content I've ordered.

I never trust the quality of these articles and wouldn't blindly share them with my readers. 

Here are the articles that I have used with this method here on EntreResource.com. 

The article on shipping rates has been an amazing source of traffic for me. I knew that the article would drive a great deal of traffic and the topic was extremely dry and didn't require much personalization.

It has ranked now for 5,300 different keywords and generates 1400 organic page views per month!

This was a result of good keyword research rather than high quality content writing, but still, not too shabby. 

That article ranks for 534 keywords and drives 108 organic page views per month. 

Again, a result of quality keyword research, but I did enjoy outsourcing such dry content. 

Just because content is dry doesn't mean that my readers won't find it valuable. But, that doesn't mean I need to write every word of it myself. 

Final Word

TextBroker is good, not great. 

Depending on your goals, it may be a resource worth considering, but you will most likely get B to C level content regardless of the level you choose. 

If you're ok with a lot of revision, it may still be worth your time. 

If you're goal is to fill a site with filler content (not something I recommend) TextBroker could work, but somewhere like Fiverr my be an even more cost effective option if you don't care about quality. 

About the author

Nate McCallister

Nate is the founder and main contributor of EntreResource.com. He is a lifestyle entrepreneur who spends his time building businesses and raising his two kids Sawyer and Brooks with his beautiful wife Emily. His main interests include copywriting, economics and piano.

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